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Judy Bluehorse Skelton

Risks of Diabetes

• I have a parent, brother, or sister with diabetes.

• My family background is Alaska Native, American Indian, African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American, or Pacific Islander.

• I have had gestational diabetes, or I gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds.

• My blood pressure is 140/90 mm Hg or above, or I have been told that I have high blood pressure.

• My cholesterol levels are not normal. My HDL cholesterol—“good” cholesterol—is below 35 mg/dL, or my triglyceride level is above 250 mg/dL.

• I am fairly inactive.

• I exercise fewer than three times a week.

• I have a history of cardiovascular disease.

Your risks are greater if you are overweight and don’t do any physical activities.  If your body shape has the apple shape, a big belly, you are more likely to become a type2 diabetic.

The more overweight you are — and the less physical activity you do — the greater your risk of developing diabetes. In particular, central body fat (being “apple shaped” or having what’s sometimes called “big belly obesity”) is linked to Type 2 diabetes.

What causes diabetes?

The actual causes of diabetes are not fully understood, but scientists believe it is related to hereditary genetics, malnutrition, and physiological responses to a virus (pancreas).

Other things that can contribute to diabetes are:

Drugs:  Certain prescribed drugs can induce diabetes

Infections:  Strephylococci may be a factor for infecting the pancreas.

Stress:  Physical injury or a traumatic event that triggers your body to produce cortisol.

Can I reduce my risks of type2 diabetes?

Yes!  You have already taken the first step in preventing type2 diabetes by reading through this information and checking your risk potential.