Agnes Pilgrim

Agnes Baker Pilgrim was born in a little town at the headwaters of the Siletz River and is a spiritual elder of the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz in Oregon.  As the oldest living member of her tribe, the Takelma people (originally from Southern Oregon), Pilgrim is called Tawaywe (sp?) by her people. Pilgrim shares that our Native culture is the glue that holds our people together.  Agnes serves as the Chairperson of the International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers, an organization representing a global alliance using prayer and education towards the healing of Mother Earth and all her inhabitants.

Pilgrim shares her knowledge about the Native ways of knowing in her work to restore balance back into the physical world.  She teaches about the spiritual importance of water and talks about the state of water as a world resource, how it has been abused, and what strategies we need to consider for restoring the sacred aspects of this part of our lives.

On where the human spirit is found , Pilgrim professes:

”. . . if you want peace and you want love and you want compassion, joy and happiness, look within inside here (points to chest) and you got it.”

Curriculum Overview

In this section of the curriculum we will look at traditional stories as we try to understand how stories teach us important concepts. We will also refer to the wisdoms shared by Agnes Pilgrim in her video interview.

The concepts we will examine are:

  • The Teaching in Our Stories
  • The Hero’s Journey of Transformation
  • Wisdom of Our Elders
  • Problem Solving
  • Working Together to Solve Problems

Begin Woodrow Morrison Jr's Lessons