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Career Pathways Planning Curriculum

Lesson Plans: Part Two

Lesson Four: Affirmations

“Judge a person for what she is, instead of what she is not.”

Another important step in developing our self-image is to focus on our strengths, not our weaknesses. So much of modern culture seems set up to remind us of our deficiencies and what we cannot do. Even the educational system works that way.

In this exercise, let’s explore the positive strengths of our story tellers and determine how the experiences of the Hero’s Journey influenced the ability to create affirmations of strength. Please review and identify the purpose that each role serves. John Spence is completed as an example. The last line is left blank for you to complete an example about yourself. Please discuss with a counselor, friend, family member, or elder.

 

Hero’s Journey

Strength

John Spence Orphan: observed Indian adults to drink alcohol; was always poor; feared being taken away by case workersWanderer: enjoyed being a lifeguard

Caregiver: remembered Grandmother’s teachings of being kind; had family friends give him summer jobs

Warrior: worked to help kids like himself

Shaman: giving back to the Indian community through service

  • Kind and helpful to people
  • Started NARA

 

  • Supportive yet doesn’t give advice
  • Understanding

 

  • Leader in the community
 Kevin Goodluck Orphan:Wanderer:

Caregiver:

Warrior:

Shaman:

Frank Alby Orphan:Wanderer:

Caregiver:

Warrior:

Shaman:

 
Marc Anderson Orphan:Wanderer:

Caregiver:

Warrior:

Shaman:

 
Ben Rhodd Orphan:Wanderer:

Caregiver:

Warrior:

Shaman:

Marilyn Balluta Orphan:Wanderer:

Caregiver:

Warrior:

Shaman: